Ministry Opportunity: Kingston, Tas

Assistant Minister

The Christian Reformed Church of Kingston, Tasmania

 

Kingston

 

Description of Christian Reformed Church of Kingston (‘CRCK’)

CRCK is a growing, evangelical church in Kingston, Tasmania (ten minutes south of Hobart). We have 350 members, covering a wide spectrum of ages and backgrounds, and three, full-time pastors (Lead, Assistant, and Children’s and Youth). We are part of a network of five other churches, all of whom CRCK has planted over the last fifteen years. As such, every pastor who works with us is part of a large, supportive team. Kingston has approximately 20,000 people and is the fastest growing municipality in Tasmania, so there are also huge opportunities for outreach in our area.

Our current Assistant Pastor is leaving at the end of 2014 and we are looking for a replacement to begin in January 2015.

Who we are looking for

  • Someone with a deep love for God, his people, and the lost.
  • Someone who is prayerful.
  • Someone who can recruit and train ministry leaders.
  • Someone who can explain and apply the Bible to people in their everyday lives.
  • Someone with good people skills, who can urge people to follow Jesus whole-heartedly.
  • Someone with the ability to work closely in a ministry team environment.
  • Someone with a sense of adventure and a willingness to try new things.

 

If you would like to know more, or get a detailed job description, please contact

Des Smith (Lead Pastor)

0405 540 852

des.smith@crckingston.org.au.

 

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MARCH Catalyst Out Now!

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CATALYST March is out!

The next edition of CRCA Catalyst has been released and is ready for download here.

This new edition discusses the following

  • Three recently ordained CRCA Pastors share their varied paths toward ministry
  • We visit Narre Warren’s Transit Soup Kitchen, and observe how they are bringing Jesus to the least, the last, and the lost
  • We look at the RTC’s Fan The Flame conference, and see how it works to clarify people’s expectations about study for ministry and mission
  • Joe Vermeulen writes about Cyber Bullying, and what we can do about it

We encourage you to view and download the latest Catalyst, and share the link as widely as possible.

If you want to leave feedback, please make a comment on the blog.

Happy Reading!

Dave Groenenboom

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Cyber Bullying – Bonus Article

This week, CRCA Catalyst presents Cyber Bullying – a special article prepared by Pastor Joe Vermeulen. Joe is Pastor at Grace CRC on Perth’s north side, and a member of the Committee for Social Responsibility in CRCA CLassis WA.

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Cyber Bullying is more common than we realise. Indeed, most catalyst readers will have observed some Cyber Bullying, even if only in a passive sense.

As followers of Jesus, we are called to transform our interactions on the internet, and have those interactions reflect and express the sort of world that God delights in. Our prayer is that this article will assist you on doing so.

This article was not included in the last issue of Catalyst – but it will be included in the next! We are releasing this to you now, trusting it will be an encouragement to you and those you love.

Dave Groenenboom

How to make Catalyst work

Wondering how to comment or interact with CRCA Catalyst?

I have already written something up on that a few months ago, and you can read about it here.

Keep in mind that as the weeks go by, I will post key articles as stand alone pieces, allowing for closer interaction and comment. You can use these re-posts to inform your prayer life and family or home group discussion.

Please make use of the comment facility: it is a terrific way to maintain conversation about the various topics and issues raised in each edition of Catalyst.

Further, there is some additional material on Cyber Bullying which has been prepared by Classis WA’s Committee for Social Responsibility. This very helpful article will be a great resource to hand out to people and to make available in your congregation. We’ll be posting that in the next few days.

Grace and peace,
Dave Groenenboom

October CATALYST out now!

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CATALYST October is out!

The next edition of CRCA Catalyst has been released and is ready for download here.

This new edition includes

  • news about a CRCA Church Planting ministry in Madhya Pradesh, India
  • how Crossroad Bible Institute is partnering with SWIM to bring transformation in the Solomon Islands
  • how social media can be used for ministry and mission
  • US Church Planting researcher, Ed Stetzer, shares his observations about Australia
  • an interview that outlines some of the ways the TRAIN workgroup manage accountability with Jack de Vries, the CRCA’s Ministry Development Coach

We encourage you to view and download the latest Catalyst, and share the link as widely as possible.

If you want to leave feedback, feel free to make a comment on the blog. Various articles will be released as separate posts over the next weeks.

Happy Reading!

Dave

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CRCA Ministry Share – and why it’s a very good thing…

Ever wondered what your church’s ‘ministry share’ actually achieves? Is it really just a ‘church tax’? It may be time to think again. Tony Deenick tells us why…

[This material is being circulated so local churches and pastors can encourage their members to give generously to the CRCA Deficit Reduction Appeal, which is being held this coming Sunday, August 19, in many CRCA congregations – DG]

As individual churches there are often things we would like to do which we can’t afford or can’t easily do on our own. Alternatively, we may simply want to do some things less expensively or do them better by being part of a group. So every three years at a meeting of representatives of all our churches, called the Synod, we decide what things we can best do together as a denomination. To pay for these ministries churches agree to pay a “ministry share” based on membership. In practice the ministry share represents around 6% (±3%) of a church’s budget, depending on size and levels of giving.

So what does your church’s Ministry Share payment accomplish?

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Well, it is used to cover administration and denominational legal obligations, such things as setting minister’s salary levels, providing for long service leave, collecting and disbursing superannuation payments, paying copyright fees and providing financial advice. Some of the money goes towards maintaining the denominational website and web addresses and publishing the annual church yearbook. Other funds are used to provide for the cost of Synods and the work of synodical committees which provide oversight over the joint activities and denominational workers. Some committees undertake research on behalf of the churches in areas of common interest. For example, the last Synod set up a committee to look into the salaries of ministers and ministry workers and another to investigate the best alternative to replace the 1984 version of the NIV for church use. All these activities are provided or supported by the denominational Treasurer and Administrator.

The largest proportion of ministry share funds goes towards providing leadership, mentoring, training and support to local churches through our denominational workers

A significant proportion of the money goes towards supporting the work of the Reformed Theological College in Geelong and the Candidacy Committee as they prepare people for ministry in our churches, monitor their progress and provide them with a vicariate (a year of “on the job” training in a local church under the guidance of a senior pastor). In addition some funds are used to help cover the costs of leadership training in churches and in-service training and support at ReCharge (Ministers & Wives) conferences. A small part of ministry share also goes towards supporting the denomination’s mission in the Solomons.

The largest proportion of ministry share funds goes towards providing leadership, mentoring, training and support to local churches through our denominational workers: the Ministry Development Coach and the Youth and Children’s Coordinators. They also help promote the vision of the CRCA and coordinate joint activities by the churches.

In particular, the Ministry Development Coach is responsible for resourcing churches for growth, health and development, promoting collaborative approaches in this and other training initiatives, promoting the CRCA vision including producing newsletters and overseeing the denominational website, and generally assisting and coaching ministers, church planters and other church workers.

The Youth Coordinator is responsible for assisting with training in youth leadership, development of youth evangelism and nurture in the local church, oversight of regional and national youth programs such as the ministry internship program and convention planning, management of the Resource Centre, and general coaching, support and encouragement of youth workers in our churches.

The Children’s Coordinator is responsible for promoting effective children’s ministries in the local churches, providing resources for these ministries, overseeing and providing training in the ChildSafe program, maintaining a healthy network of children’s workers and providing them with advice and support.

By working together through a relatively small ‘ministry share’, contribution, each local church helps to provide substantial services and support to all the churches corporately.

Your generous support through ministry share helps the CRCA continue to deliver good leadership and helpful resources to local churches.

– Tony Deenick Building & Finance Committee (previously known as The Synodical Board of Management)

Ministry Formation: A short History

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We have all heard about Ministry Formation, but why was this work begun, and what is it seeking to do now?

In 2003, Synod established the Ministry Formation Workgroup. This committee got to work with developing ways that local churches can better engage in the work of developing leaders and engaging in mission in their local communities.

In 2006 this work was expanded as Synod appointed a Mission Training Coordinator (Rev Jack de Vries) to spearhead this work. Jack worked hard with the Ministry Formation Workgroup to promote the Four Fold Task, adopted in 2006. The Four Fold Task had the basic mission statement “The Christian Reformed Churches of Australia are churches reforming to reach the lost for Christ.” We call this a ‘mission statement’ because it outlines the core task that we are working toward. This mission was divided into four main tasks:

Pray: To call upon God for such an outpouring of his Spirit that his people will be assured of his love through his Word, seek to please the Saviour in all things, manifest the godly life and be filled with prayerful and sacrificial compassion for the lost in all the world

Multiply: To enable local churches to expand numerically, equip and nurture their members, and become the mother-churches of as many fellowships and congregations as possible; and also to take further initiatives to create fellowships by penetrating structures of society with the gospel.

Train: To multiply the number of well-trained persons (ordained, non-ordained, full time, part time, voluntary) lovingly dedicated to the creation and development of such fellowships and congregations by proclaiming the gospel

Align: To reform continually the life of the denomination (including our church ethos, customs, church order, use of resources, denominational committees, support staff and agencies) to encourage and enable the fulfilment of the fundamental aim

Synod 2009 affirmed these core tasks, and embarked on some restructuring work that would enable local churches to pursue these tasks more effectively.

Both before and after Synod 2009, however, some thought the Four Fold Task was too narrowly focused around mission work, and that it did not give enough emphasis to important tasks like pastoral care and preaching. For reasons like these, Synod 2012 modified the tasks to include aspects of church health – which obviously includes aspects like preaching and pastoral care. The hope is that these decisions will see local churches with growing emphases on matters of

Discipleship: growing disciples is an all of life process. Whether we are talking about children, youth, young adults, middle aged or young people, we are to encouraged them and develop them as disciples of Jesus. The overall goal is to move people toward maturity in Christ (see Col 1:28). We will be working hard to help local churches find effective ways to encourage people of all ages to grow in their faith, to be positively engaged in their local church, and to develop their determination to express the Kingdom in their daily lives.

Leader training: a specific work group has been developed to provide resources to help local churches train and develop elders, deacons, and other leaders. Obviously, a decision at Synod cannot make things happen at the local level. These resources need to be embraced and fully implemented in local churches.

Growing and developing healthy churches: in addition to the core tasks of faithful preaching, proper administration of the sacraments, and faithful application of church discipline, there are many resources local churches can use to help them assess how they are going and find ways to become more healthy.

In the same way that no person can ever say that they have ‘made it’ and that they don’t have to grow any more. Local churches, too, can never say ‘we’ve arrived’ or ‘we’re doing everything perfectly. Church health, then, will only ever be relative.

With a view to assist local churches in this work, Synod agreed to establish Church Health Networks in every Classis. Jack de Vries will work with Classes to help local churches do the sort of things that will lead them to greater health.

So Synod 2012 has made a good move: the denomination has a more simple structure which, Lord willing, will help members move more effectively toward maturity, which will help train elders and other leaders, and which will result in the sort of growth that honours Christ our Saviour.

CRCA Structure 2009

2009 Structure

CRCA Structure 2012

2012 Structure

“Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”” (Matthew 28:18–20, NIV)

– Dave Groenenboom